Indonesia: Re-advertisement National Consultant: National strategy on Out of School Children (OOSC), based in Jakarta, Indonesia

Organization: UN Children’s Fund
Country: Indonesia
Closing date: 23 Jan 2018

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For 70 years, UNICEF has been working on the ground in 190 countries and territories to promote children’s survival, protection and development. The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments.

BACKGROUND Indonesia’s education sector continues to improve and the government spending on education shows an upward trend with 20% of the total government expenditure allocated to education development since 2009. Indonesia has made notable progress as well in terms of enrollment in primary education. Data suggests that Indonesia has achieved high and sustained rates of primary school participation where around 95 per cent of children aged 7 – 12 years old are attending primary school and this figure has remained the same during the latest 10 years. However, challenges remain with respect to access to secondary education. At junior secondary education level, the net enrollment rate is still far from achieving compulsory basic education for all children in the country. The 2016 data from MoEC shows that the NER of junior secondary school (JSS) was 81 per cent and the NER of senior secondary school (SSS) was 59 per cent.

Considering that the total population of school age children in Indonesia is very high (i.e. more than 54 million, MoEC, 2016), the data above then indicates that there is huge number of school age children who are not enrolled in school. Data from the 2016 S– USENAS highlight that more than 4.6 million Indonesian children who should be in school are not: 271,404 children of primary school age, 721,645 of junior secondary school age (13-15 years), and 3.63 million of senior secondary school age (16-18 years). Furthermore, about 23 per cent of adolescents (15-19 years) are not in any forms of education, training or employment.

Out-of-school-children (OOSC) issues has hampered the ability of the government to fulfill access of all children to education and achieve the target of 9 years compulsory basic education in the past. Since 2015 the government’s target was expanded to 12 Years Compulsory Education which present even bigger challenge with regard to OOSC issues considering that the number of OOSC for children aged 16-18 is still very high. The government had faced a number of challenges in addressing the OOSC issues due to unavailability of comprehensive analysis on out of school children that can thoroughly describe the profiles of these children and the multiple deprivations and barriers they face with regard to education. In order to support the government in addressing this matter, since 2010 UNCEF Indonesia has participated in the global initiative on Out of School Children (OOSC) that was jointly led by UNICEF and the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS). The initiative facilitated the implementation of Out of School Children study in Indonesia and helped identify the detailed profile of OOSC, barriers and bottlenecks to children being in schools, and analyze the existing interventions related to enhanced school participation.

The study identified there were a number of barriers to children being in school, both at the supply and demand sides. The study revealed that socio-economic factors, along with geographical isolation, disabilities, gender, and the value of secondary education contribute to the out-of-school phenomena, either never attending or dropping out of school. The study also found that the majority of children drop out of school at the point of transitioning to a higher education level. There are large disparities among socioeconomic groups. For instance, children in rural areas are twice more likely to be out of school than those in urban areas. The provinces in the eastern part of Indonesia show higher out-of-school rates, while in terms of the absolute number Java shows the largest OOSC population.

The GoI’s 12 Years Compulsory Education programme

One of the main education policy objectives under the National Medium Term Development Plan 2015 – 2019 (or RPJMN 2015 – 2019) is the implementation of 12 Years Compulsory Education programme through basic education strengthening and expansion of access to secondary education. The purpose of this programme is to ensure that all school-age children (7 – 18 years) have access to education services until upper secondary level. Important tools have been introduced by the government to support the implementation of this programme. One of themis the Smart Indonesia Programme which is implemented through the distribution of Smart Indonesia Card (Kartu Indonesia Pintar – KIP). In 2015 the government has allocated significant budget for this programme forthe Ministry of Education and Culture (MoEC) and the Ministry of Religious Affairs (MoRA) to cover around 20 million school aged children from poor families including out of school children.

Nevertheless, it will not be possible to successfully implement the 12 Years Compulsory Education programme if there is no adequate strategy to address the issue of out-of-school children. It has been identified that the government is lacking accurate data on out-of-school children and currently MoEC and MoRA are still facing many difficulties in verifying the data of school aged children from poor families (both in school and out of school children) to fulfill the total allocation of KIP cards. The data used by the government mostly concern information about children in school and cannot yet properly identify who are out of school, where they are, and what the major barriers for their schooling are. In addition, the existing programmes that aim to support improved school participation, especially for children from marginalized groups, are not yet well integrated and coordinated.

In order to address these challenges, the national government needs to develop focused, efficient, and effective strategies that can address the issue of out of school children and inequalities in access to education services. UNICEF has been facilitating development of a National Strategy on Out of School Children (Strategi Nasional Penanganan Anak Tidak Sekolah) that aims to support optimal implementation of the12 Years Compulsory Education Programme. The process of developing the strategy includes:

•Synthesizing the current OOSC situation in Indonesia based on existing data•Mapping and reviewing existing programmes and policies that relate to enhancement of access to education and identifying successes and challenges of these programmes in addressing OOSC issues. •Reviewing existing evidence from available research and studies related to out of school children including research on children with disabilities and child marriage.•Based on the reviews above and consultations with relevant stakeholders, identifying practical, scalable strategies to address OOSC issues including implementation mechanism at sub-national level •Based on the results of the above processes, drafting the National Strategy on Out of School Children.

In order to support the above development process, UNICEF will recruit a national consultant. The consultant will coordinate and provide technical support for the development and finalization of the strategy in collaboration with the international consultant. The work of the consultant will build upon the experiences of past and existing policies and programmes. The consultant will work closely with relevant partners including BAPPENAS, MoEC, other line ministries, civil society and academia.

WORK ASSIGNMENT:•Review the consolidated reports of OOSC consultation workshops as well as the reports of the previous consultancy and develop summary report that identify how key issues in these reports should be integrated in the National Strategy on Out of School Children.•Coordinate with and facilitate internal discussion with the team at the Directorate of Education, Bappenas, and other relevant parties to clarify the inputs obtained in the consultation workshops and to gain further inputs for development of the National Strategy on Out of School Children.•Conduct field visit to selected areas to learn about the mechanism implemented by local governments to address the issue of out-of-school children.•Provide technical support in the review of existing policy documents, studies and research reports for development of a concise report that summarizes key issues, lessons learned and potential strategies concerning OOSC.•Prepare and coordinate consultation meetings with the Directorate of Education, Bappenas, MoEC and other partners and provide technical assistance for development of a draft framework of the National Strategy on Out of School Children. •Based on the draft framework of the National Strategy on Out of School Children and the result of additional consultations with relevant parties, provide technical assistance for development of the first draft of the National Strategy on Out of School Children.•Support and facilitate consultations with relevant parties (government, development partners, NGOs, CSOs) on the first draft of the National Strategy on Out of School Children. •Taking into account the inputs obtained from the above consultations and in coordination with the Directorate of Education, Bappenas, provide technical assistance for revision and refinement of the draft of National Strategy on Out of School Children.•Conduct field visits to selected areas and consultation meetings with relevant parties to identify proper mechanisms for operationalization of the National Strategy on Out of School Children at sub-national level.•Based on findings from the field visits and consultation meetings and in coordination with the Directorate of Education, Bappenas, propose operational steps for the implementation of the National Strategy on Out of School Children at sub-national level.•In consultation with the Directorate of Education, Bappenas, facilitate organization and implementation of a national consultation meeting on the final draft of the National Strategy on OOSC.•Taking into account the inputs provided in the national consultation meeting above, support the finalization of the National Strategy on OOSC.

OUTPUT:•Summary report on key issues identified in the reports that should be integrated in the National Strategy on Out of School Children.•Consultation meeting reports that describe additional issues need to be integrated into the National Strategy on Out of School Children.•Field trip reports that describe how local governments address the issue of out-of-school children•Report on technical assistance provided for development of a concise report that summarizes key issues, lessons learned and potential strategies concerning OOSC.•Report on technical assistance provided for development of draft framework of the National Strategy on Out of School Children. •Report on technical assistance provided for development of the first draft of the National Strategy on Out of School Children.•Summary reports of the consultation meetings.•Report on technical assistance provided for draft improvement of the National Strategy on OOSC.•Field visits and consultation meetings report•Operational steps for the implementation of the National Strategy on Out of School Children at sub-national level.•Report of the national consultation meeting.•Final version of the National Strategy on Out of School Children.

IDEAL PROFILE OF THE CONSULTANT:•Relevant master degree qualifications in education or social science.•At least 10 years’ experience in education or social sector(s) especially experience in providing technical assistance to government stakeholders and in conducting research/study in education sector. •Strong knowledge and experience in programmes related to out-of-school children or education participation enhancement.•Strong knowledge about government education systems and programmes which is supported by experiences in working for projects/programmes involving national and sub-national governments as well as other development partners. •Good written and spoken communication skills in English – essential.•Experience in working for or collaborating with international organizations is a strong asset.•Strong interpersonal and proven communications skills especially in advocating or dealing with GoI and donor partner stakeholders.

Closing date: 23 January 2018

Disclaimer: The screening of your application will be conducted based on the information in your profile. Before applying, we strongly suggest that you review your profile to ensure accuracy and completeness.

This is a Re-advertisement: applicants who had previously applied will be considered and need not re-apply.

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UNICEF is committed to diversity and inclusion within its workforce, and encourages qualified female and male candidates from all national, religious and ethnic backgrounds, including persons living with disabilities, to apply to become a part of our organization.

How to apply:

UNICEF is committed to diversity and inclusion within its workforce, and encourages qualified female and male candidates from all national, religious and ethnic backgrounds, including persons living with disabilities, to apply to become a part of our organization. To apply, click on the following link http://www.unicef.org/about/employ/?job=508577

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